CNCHL > International Humanitarian Law (IHL)  

Home
The Canadian National Committee for Humanitarian Law (CNCHL)
International Humanitarian Law (IHL)
Issues
IHL Links
International Bodies

International Humanitarian Law (IHL)

International Humanitarian Law (IHL)

What is International Humanitarian Law (IHL)
International Humanitarian Law (IHL) – also known as the Law of Armed Conflict – is a set of rules that protect people and property in times of war and provide provisions to limit or prohibit certain methods and means of war. It is different than jus ad bellum, which deals with the right to resort to force. IHL applies to any situation where armed conflict exists de facto, regardless of the reasons for the conflict. More»

History of IHL
The intent to protect individuals from the consequences of war has existed since the dawn of time. Protective rules can be found in Antiquity, the Middle Ages and in modern times. The instruments of the 19th and 20th centuries were not the first treaties on this issue. Humanitarian ideals and concepts formalized in legal instruments transcend various cultural traditions and make the rules and principles of international humanitarian law timeless. More»

The Geneva Conventions and their Protocols
The 1949 Geneva Conventions, set out the principle of independent, undiscriminating aid provided to soldiers who are wounded, sick or shipwrecked or who have been taken prisoner, and thus cannot defend themselves. There is also protection from the effects of war for civilians. This protection is granted through several international instruments, the basis of which is the four 1949 Geneva Conventions and their Additional Protocols . More»

Other Treaties
While the 1949 Geneva Conventions and their Additional Protocols of 1977 stand at the core of International Humanitarian Law, a number of other international legal instruments regulate armed conflict. This section offers a list of relevant international humanitarian law conventions, declarations and resolutions adopted prior to or after the 1949 Geneva Conventions and their Additional Protocols of 1977. More»

All content copyright © 2006-2011